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HomeBreaking NewsUK rail workers resume strike action as negotiations stall again

UK rail workers resume strike action as negotiations stall again

'Quick read' news summary

More sectors to join industrial action later this month as workers demand a living wage that allows them to cope with surging inflation.

Railway workers across the UK have launched strikes, accusing the government of blocking rail operators from offering an acceptable proposal on job security, pay and working conditions.

Many workers find themselves unable to make ends meet as surging inflation and 10 years of stagnant wage growth batter them and their families.

Among the workers’ other concerns that were brought up over the months that this dispute has gone on are job security, with threatened cuts to some maintenance teams that could in turn impact negatively the safety of the networks, their passengers, and the people working on them.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) at Network Rail and 14 train operators are holding two 48-hour walkouts on Tuesday and Thursday, while drivers in the Aslef union will strike on Thursday.

Passengers are being warned of “significant disruptions” to their journeys, with only a limited number of trains running.

The government has said it cannot afford to give public sector workers an inflation-matching rise, meaning there is no end in sight to what has been dubbed a new “winter of discontent” in reference to the industrial battles that gripped Britain in the late 1970s.

Nurses, airport staff and postal workers have also joined the action, demanding pay that keeps up with the inflation hovering around 40-year highs, reaching 10.7 percent in November.

Teachers are due to go on strike in Scotland next week.

A YouGov poll published in December found two-thirds of Britons support the nurses’ strike.

A Department for Transport spokesperson said inflation-matching pay increases for public sector workers would cost everyone “more in the long term – worsening debt, fuelling inflation, and costing

More sectors to join industrial action later this month as workers demand a living wage that allows them to cope with surging inflation. Many workers find themselves unable to make ends meet as surging inflation and 10 years of stagnant wage growth batter them and their families. Nurses, airport staff and postal workers have also joined the action, demanding pay that keeps up with the inflation hovering around 40-year highs, reaching 10.7 percent in November.

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