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HomeActivismResearchers Create System Where CO2 Rooftop Ventilators Help Make Rooftop Garden Plants...

Researchers Create System Where CO2 Rooftop Ventilators Help Make Rooftop Garden Plants Grow 4x Bigger

'Quick read' news summary

According to a new study, new carbon dioxide ventilators may possibly turn fumes into fertilizer in order to bring vegetable patches to high rise building rooftops.

While this wasn’t just suggested, the study also included an experiment that discovered how spinach, by new air vents, managed to grow four-times bigger than the other plants in the study. The scientists that conducted the study share that this is quite the breakthrough, and a promising develop to making city life healthier.

The research team, composed of scientists from Boston University, crated new technology that turns carbon dioxide (CO2) that’s pumped from building air vents into fertilizer that improves the challenging plant-growing environments for plant-life on rooftops.

There are hundreds of rooftop vegetable gardens, both big and small, that can found in a variety of cities all throughout the world. However, most of them are hydroponic systems, which means they get nutrients and water from a special mist that gets pushed and spread through tubes.

Many of these rooftop farms and garden supposedly help to improve the air quality of such cities, but the conditions tend to be quite difficult and harsh for some. More often than not, the plants that grow tend to be smaller or less healthy than others precisely because where they are situated tends to gain more solar radiation, have more wind exposure, and the soil where they are buried is usually drier than usual.

What the research group decided to do was intercede by repurposing the CO2 that’s usually emitted from the exhaust of the building into a fertilizer to help the plants grow.

According to the lead researcher on the study, Sarabeth Buckley, who is now with the University of Cambridge, the team started growing corn and spinach on a Boston University campus roof, an experiment they called BIG GRO.

She said, “We wanted

According to a new study, new carbon dioxide ventilators may possibly turn fumes into fertilizer in order to bring vegetable patches to high rise building rooftops. The research team, composed of scientists from Boston University, crated new technology that turns carbon dioxide (CO2) that’s pumped from building air vents into fertilizer that improves the challenging plant-growing environments for plant-life on rooftops. There are hundreds of rooftop vegetable gardens, both big and small, that can found in a variety of cities all throughout the world.

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