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HomeHealthNew Guidelines for Kids With Obesity: What Parents Should Know

New Guidelines for Kids With Obesity: What Parents Should Know

'Quick read' news summary

Jan. 13, 2023 -- The American Academy of Pediatrics last week issued their first new guidelines in 15 years for evaluating and treating kids and adolescents with overweight or obesity. “It's a misunderstanding, it's being sensationalized,” says Lori Fishman, PsyD, a child psychologist who specializes in pediatric weight management. “And many kids will not outgrow it, so it's important to identify children with obesity early and offer them evidence-based treatments.”

Jan. 13, 2023 — The American Academy of Pediatrics last week issued their first new guidelines in 15 years for evaluating and treating kids and adolescents with overweight or obesity. 

If you only saw the headlines, you might think that when a youngster is a few pounds overweight, their pediatrician will prescribe a weight loss drug or bariatric surgery. The reality is much less alarming. The guidelines take a deep dive into evidence-based treatments at various levels.

“It’s a misunderstanding, it’s being sensationalized,” says Lori Fishman, PsyD, a child psychologist who specializes in pediatric weight management. “There’s so much more to the process. It’ll be a small percentage of kids who’ll even qualify for these treatments.” 

Treating the Whole Child

Before writing the guidelines, the AAP’s Subcommittee on Obesity spent years analyzing and synthesizing information from nearly 400 studies. 

“We now have more information than ever that supports that obesity is a chronic, complex disease that requires a whole-child approach,” says Sarah Hampl, MD, one of two lead authors of the guidelines. “And many kids will not outgrow it, so it’s important to identify children with obesity early and offer them evidence-based treatments.”

In the new guidelines, treatment of overweight and obesity doesn’t mean putting a kid on a diet and expecting their parents to manage it. Instead, multi-pronged approaches might include nutrition support, physical activity specialists, behavioral therapy, medications for adolescents 12 and up, and surgery for teenagers with severe obesity. 

Before starting any of these evidence-based treatments, the guidelines remind pediatricians to consider each child’s individual circumstances — their living situation, their access to healthy food, and more.

“As pediatricians, we ought to be especially mindful of the influences that child and family are surrounded by,”

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