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HomeBreaking News'I pretended a delivery driver set my house on fire just to...

‘I pretended a delivery driver set my house on fire just to get through to Evri’

'Quick read' news summary

Frustrated customers of under-fire delivery firm Evri have resorted to desperate measures to get their parcels as calls grow for an investigation into the company.

Shoppers have been turning up at the company’s warehouses and faking job applications in order to speak to Evri managers after weeks of delays which have meant some customers are yet to receive Christmas presents.

Fed up with the company’s automated chatbot and unable to get through to customer service, one business owner claimed she had to pretend a delivery driver had set her house on fire to get the company to respond.

Carolyn Harris, the Labour MP, raised the issue on Wednesday at Prime Minister’s Questions in the House of Commons, asking if Rishi Sunak would order an investigation over Evri’s “poor customer service”.

She asked: “Does the Prime Minister believe that over 40,000 interactions by either social media, email or letter regarding the poor customer service and working conditions at the delivery company Evri warrants an investigation by the relevant Government department?

“His ministers in BEIS (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) think not. But I’m sure the Prime Minister would want the general public to believe that he at least is interested enough in this problem to take action.”

Mr Sunak said that ministers “have looked into this issue and are currently considering the matter at hand”, adding: “I would be happy to write to her when we learn more about the situation.”

Evri has apologised to customers across the UK who are still waiting for delayed Christmas deliveries. The firm said staff shortages, Royal Mail strikes and bad weather have contributed to the problems and it is working to sort them out.

The company, formerly known as Hermes,

Frustrated customers of under-fire delivery firm Evri have resorted to desperate measures to get their parcels as calls grow for an investigation into the company. She asked: "Does the Prime Minister believe that over 40,000 interactions by either social media, email or letter regarding the poor customer service and working conditions at the delivery company Evri warrants an investigation by the relevant Government department? Evri has apologised to customers across the UK who are still waiting for delayed Christmas deliveries.

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